Bibliography….

7 Feb

World wide web research

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=127985065.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwsOXU0lmJk&feature=related; warphotography; 4th nocember, 2008.

 

http://www.nppa.org/news_and_events/news/2006/03/bopST05.html; National press photographers association, March 23rd 2006.

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/tag/disaster-photography/; The new york times blog, March 24th 2011

 

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/03/pictures/110315-nuclear-reactor-japan-tsunami-earthquake-world-photos-meltdown/; National geographic, March 15th 2011

 

http://mcdermottphotos.com/; Matthew Mcdermott

 

Book

Cohen, Daniel. Yellow journalism: Scandal, sensationalism, gossip in the media, 21st century, April 1st 2000.

Arnold Genthe

23 Jan

Researching into the depths of disaster photography, i came across Arnold Genthe. I thought this would be relevant for my dvd as this shows just how long disaster photography has been recorded, and also shows that it has also been in the media.

 

He took a well known disaster photograph from that time of an earthquake that happened in San francisco.  Born in Berlin in 1869, then following in his fathers footsteps, Genthe became a classically trained scholar. He is best known for his photo’s of San Francisco chinatown in 1906 of the san francisco earthquake.  Emigrating to San Francisco in 1895 to work as a tutor, he taught himself photography after being intrigue by the chinese section of the city. He started photographing its inhabitants from children to drug addicts. After local magazines published some of his photographs in the late 1890s, he opened a portrait studio. Although in 1906, San Francisco suffered from a earthquake disaster and fire. It destroyed his studio yet he managed to capture the earthquake’s aftermath with this ‘Looking down Sacremento street, San francisco, April 18th 1906…. IS his most famous photograph. This shows that even before our time, disaster photography was considered as crossing the line into sensationalism.

 

Different disaster event photography…. Tsunami…

22 Jan

The Tsunami
Japan’s most powerful earthquake since records began has struck the north-east coast, triggering a massive tsunami.

Cars, ships and buildings were swept away by a wall of water after the 8.9-magnitude tremor, which struck about 400km (250 miles) north-east of Tokyo.

A state of emergency has been declared at a nuclear power plant, where pressure has exceeded normal levels.

Officials say 350 people are dead and about 500 missing, but it is feared the final death toll will be much higher.

This was a natural disaster that was captured throughout disaster photography.

2.

A person on the third floor of a Japanese airport photographs damage and debris.

4.

Cars and other debris swept away by tsunami tidal waves are seen in Kesennuma in Miyagi Prefecture, northern Japan.

9.

Houses swallowed by the tsunami burn in Sendai, Miyagi.

Waves of tsunami topple trees.

12.

Light planes and vehicles mashed together.

Different disaster photography events – 911

21 Jan

The september 11 attacks (also referred to 9/11) were a series of four coordinated suicide attacks upon the United States in New York City and the Washington, D.C. areas on September 11, 2001. On that Tuesday morning, 19 terrorists from the islamist militant group Al- Qaeda  hijacked four passenger jets. The hijackers intentionally crashed two planes, American airlines flight 11 and United airlines flight 175 into the Twin Towers of the World Trade Centre in New York City; both towers collapsed within two hours. Hijackers crashed American airlines flight 77 into The Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia. The fourth jet, United airlines flight 93, crashed into a field near Shanksville, Penncylvania after passengers attempted to take control before it could reach the hijacker’s intended target in Washington, D.C. Nearly 3,000 died in the attacks.

 

25 Most Powerful Photos125 Most Powerful Photos25 Most Powerful Photos1

 

Script for DVD …

20 Jan

Disaster photography … When does disaster photography cross the line from informative to sensationalist?

 

Disaster’s. Extreme sudden events causing the uproar of our earth to go somewhat unhinged as a matter of physical, mental and emotional pain. Death and destruction whether its Natural or provoked by man kind is something our earth and our lives face every day.

 

We see these disasters through the the exploitation of disaster photography across the world which is shown in every crevice of media possible. We as a nation are fed this information through things such as the internet, to newspapers, to then news coverage on the tv, to also magazines. The endless photographs of disasters are made possible by the 24 hour media cycle.

 

The images from our worldly going’s on were considered as a traumatic revelation 20 years ago, but today, seeing these images is so common that we tend to see this as we read the newspaper with our morning coffee turning the page after feeling 30 seconds of sorrow or seeing it on the news as we sit own to our evening meal.

But the question is;  has disaster photography crossed the line from these images giving rise to our knowledge and care in these shocking times of disaster, or are these overrated images that are not even showing the true revelation of these disasters used for pure entertainment where these sorts of things do not happen?  Part of this may be due to the fact that in the media, we are not shown the true nature of what happens through photography. Instead we are shown overrated images of some debris left from the tragedy. However, These images are not shown in the laid back media, but are hidden in crevices for people not to see these shocking photographs of dead bodies and unsound humanity. Does this show that disaster photography has crossed the line from being informative to sensationalistic???

 

On the other hand, we could argue that the media do show signs of informative aspects  to our nation. This coverage from 911 is shocking but are very realistic as they showcase the real occurrence of a disaster from the 6 news stations of live coverage. But where were the photographs of the thousands of dead bodies?

 

 

Whilst researching i came across Matt Mcdermott, a New York City based photojournalist with over twelve years of US and international professional experience.  As a freelancer, Matthew’s work is very extensive in scope, ranging from breaking news coverage, portraiture and advertising, to world conflict documentation.  Working for a wide variety of clients in a diverse range of shooting environments, Matthew has developed a high degree of photographic flexibility and creativity always needed to succeed in the dynamic and challenging world of photography.

 

While Matthew enjoys working in all arenas of photojournalism, he personally holds a strong affinity for documenting the human struggles and triumphs associated with natural disasters and hot spot environments. Matthew’s work from Haiti’s earthquake devastated streets inspired a generous outpouring of support especially by his “Kiki” photo, the young boy rescued unharmed with arms out stretched in joy after being trapped under rubble for eight days.

 

Some of Matthew’s international projects include the documentation of the massive earthquake devastation in Pakistan…… Also the earthquake in Haiti… Matthew also captured the horrific events of the 9/11/2001 World Trade Centre attacks, human sufferings in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, and the local effects upon the Gulf’s fishing community following the massive BP oil spill.

 

His pictures have helped to increase world awareness and instill hope within people during times of darkness. Some of his photographs have had a profound effect helping to stimulate the global heart of giving, leading to the contribution of millions of dollars to charities and worldwide humanitarian efforts.

 

To our eyes, his photography is so literal, and somewhat overwhelming that i feel there is no such mention of his work being sensationalistic. We view his photographs not to entertain ourselves of what is going on around the world, but view them as an informative factor of the disasters that our world consumes.

 

 

We have become a very realistic nation and we are filled in with more and more titillating images from the disasters that happen in our world today. Why am i questioning the publication of death scenes and destruction to be considered as sensationalism? To publish images of flattened buildings or destroyed infrastructure does not convey the human toll taken in events. Those of us fortunate enough to be spared devastation on this scale need to be reminded that real people lost their lives, the survivors are struggling to cope with the result and that humans will and do recover from such tragedy. We could argue that sensationalism is nothing new. Our media has been telling stories since the early humans.

 

Researching into the depths of disaster photography, i came across Arnold Genthe. He took a well known disaster photograph from that time of an earthquake that happened in San francisco.  Born in Berlin in 1869, then following in his fathers footsteps, Genthe became a classically trained scholar. He is best known for his photo’s of San Francisco chinatown in 1906 of the san francisco earthquake.  Emigrating to San Francisco in 1895 to work as a tutor, he taught himself photography after being intrigue by the chinese section of the city. He started photographing its inhabitants from children to drug addicts. After local magazines published some of his photographs in the late 1890s, he opened a portrait studio. Although in 1906, San Francisco suffered from a earthquake disaster and fire. It destroyed his studio yet he managed to capture the earthquake’s aftermath with this ‘Looking down Sacremento street, San francisco, April 18th 1906…. IS his most famous photograph. This shows that even before our time, disaster photography was considered as crossing the line into sensationalism.

 

Something in which i haven’t mentioned is WAR. There are currently wars around the world in which provoke the factor of being a disaster produced by man kind. I feel that war photography is somewhat of the informative influence as we see the true reflection in the media of the missiles being shot through the sky, and the children carrying guns unlike the hidden images of the blood ridden dead people lying on the streets of haiti. One thing we tend not to think about is how the photographs are taken. Here is a short video example of how disaster photography is done and the viewpoint from the photographer.

 

I enjoy watching the news, and i enjoy reading the newspaper, but entertainment in its largest and most fruitless sense has become the centre piece of our culture today. But this is to be expected as we are part of a society abundant in wealth and leisure. With moderation, entertainment can be a health part of life, however as a compulsion, it serves as an addiction to useless facts. Information that only holds credible significance within its own context.

 

The fact that our obsession within entertainment is evident within the rise of sensational news coverage and photography. By this i refer to stories that have no console relevance to our nation as a whole but become news worthy simply by virtue of intrigue. How many times have we read the newspaper and hoped to learn about events of national or international significance only to be let down with a photograph that doesn’t show the trueness of a disaster. I think overall new brains of photographic journalism need to emerge so that our standards are not of the entertainment for the public, but a vision independent of NOT sensational demand, but informative demand. Then will we appreciate disaster photography for what its really about.

 

 

I believe whatever the time or setting, sensationalism is unavoidable in the media and photography, because we humans are wired, probably for the reasons of natural selection, to be alert to sensations, particularly those involved in violence and exploitation. However, there are still aspects of the informative within disaster photography. These types of images will never be hidden from us thanks to all the photojournalists out there who believe in capturing something so raw to tell us the truth. Disaster photography has crossed the line from informative to sensationalist many a times but now at least we can come to terms with reality.

Matt Mcdermott… Photojournalist

17 Jan

Whilst researching i came across Matt Mcdermott, a New York City based photojournalist with over twelve years of US and international professional experience.  As a freelancer, Matthew’s work is very extensive in scope, ranging from breaking news coverage, portraiture and advertising, to world conflict documentation.  Working for a wide variety of clients in a diverse range of shooting environments, Matthew has developed a high degree of photographic flexibility and creativity always needed to succeed in the dynamic and challenging world of photography.

While Matthew enjoys working in all arenas of photojournalism, he personally holds a strong affinity for documenting the human struggles and triumphs associated with natural disasters and hot spot environments. Matthew’s work from Haiti’s earthquake devastated streets inspired a generous outpouring of support especially by his “Kiki” photo, the young boy rescued unharmed with arms out stretched in joy after being trapped under rubble for eight days.

Some of Matthew’s international projects include the documentation of the massive earthquake devastation in Pakistan…… Also the earthquake in Haiti… Matthew also captured the horrific events of the 9/11/2001 World Trade Centre attacks, human sufferings in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, and the local effects upon the Gulf’s fishing community following the massive BP oil spill.

Take a look at his website for all his portfolio work including some of his recent work…

Disaster photography example…

16 Jan
20 Horrifying Examples of Natural Disaster Photography!
Over the recent years, I have posted various types of photography on my blog from high-speed photography to the fabulous technique of wave photography. But none of those techniques are as challenging as what I am about to share today. Since the past decade, we have seen a massive increase in natural disasters including earthquakes, floods, hurricanes and storms. However, capturing the distressing moments and terrified emotions associated with natural calamities is known as “Natural Disaster Photography”. 

Natural disasters occur all over the place and demonstrate nature’s fury and rage on mankind. Many people attribute this changing environmental trend to global warming. To capture the terrifying and heartbreaking scenes of natural disasters is a challenging and courageous job for photographers as they put their lives in jeopardy.

The following 20 thrilling shots of natural disasters are taken from recent natural calamities including the Earthquakes in New Zealand, Chile and Haiti and the floods in Australia, Pakistan and India:

1. Enigmatic Earthquakes

New Zealand Earthquake:

Workers try to put out a fire at the collapsed building of King’s Education School.

Chile Earthquake:

An 8.8-magnitude struck Chile while residents gaze at a collapsed building in Concepcion.

Yushu, China Earthquake:

Tibetans search for possessions in the middle of collapsed houses after earthquake hit the town of Gyegu, China on April 16, 2010.

Haiti Earthquake:

People look for survivors under the debris of a fallen building after an earthquake hit Port-au-Prince, Haiti on Jan. 13, 2010.

2. Volcanic Eruptions

Eyjafjallajokull Volcano, Iceland

Lightning strikes on the sky as lava flow from a volcano in Eyjafjallajokul, April 17, 2010.

Undersea Volcano, Tonga:

An undersea volcano erupts off the coast of Tonga on March 18, 2009

Mount Merapi Volcano:

Mount Merapi discharges lava and smoke as it erupted again in Klaten on November 3, 2010.

Kawah Ijen volcano, Indonesia

Fumes and bubbles of gas burst from Kawah Ijen volcano in East Java, Indonesia.

3. Ferocious Floods

Bihar Floods:

A herd of cattle trapped on small islands encircled by flood waters in the Indian state of Bihar.

Australia Floods:

Increasing floodwaters swell through Rockhampton, in eastern Queensland on January 2, 2011.

Pakistan Floods:

Residents stand besides flowing flood water in Muzaffargarh district of Punjab, Pakistan on August 9, 2010.

Tennessee Floods:

Floodwater from the Cumberland River goes down town Nashville, Tennessee on 3rd May 2010.

4. Staggering Storms:

Dakota Tornado:

A giant storm-cell hovers over the towns of Ross and Stanley, North Dakota on Monday July 12, 2010.

Montana Supercell Thunderstorm:

The Super cell Thunderstorm wrecks havoc in Montana, 2010

Australia Storm:

Rubble flies through the air as tornado rips through the town of Lennox Head, Australia on June 3, 2010.

New Mexico Storm

Lightning strikes in Roswell, New Mexico as a thunderstorm tears through town on July 14, 2010.

5. Uncontrollable Wildfires:

California Fire:

A vehicle goes by flames in California area north of Los Angeles, August 30, 2009.

Russia Fire:

A man sits helplessly on the ground while his house burns behind him in Vyksa, Russia on July 29, 2010.

Australia Fire:

A fire truck moves away from uncontrollable bushfire in the Bunyip Sate Forest west of Melbourne, Australia.

Israel Fire:

Fire fumes wild in the Carmel Forest near Haifa, Israel on December 02, 2010.
Which of these photos do you think was the most horrifying?

 

 

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